ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Effect of ionizing radiation on cellular metabolism and virus-producing ability of cell cultures

Еdie M. Plotnikova et al. , Andrey I Nikitin, Ramzi N Nizamov, Haris N Makaev, Konstantin Kh Papunidi, Nikolay M Vasilevskiy, Irina A Arkharova

Еdie M. Plotnikova et al.
Biological Safety Lab, Federal Center of Toxicological, Biological and Radiation Safety, Scientific Town-2, Kazan city, 420075, Russia. Email: adiya239731@mail.ru

Andrey I Nikitin
Biological Safety Lab, Federal Center of Toxicological, Biological and Radiation Safety, Scientific Town-2, Kazan city, 420075, Russia

Ramzi N Nizamov
Biological Safety Lab, Federal Center of Toxicological, Biological and Radiation Safety, Scientific Town-2, Kazan city, 420075, Russia

Haris N Makaev
Biological Safety Lab, Federal Center of Toxicological, Biological and Radiation Safety, Scientific Town-2, Kazan city, 420075, Russia

Konstantin Kh Papunidi
Biological Safety Lab, Federal Center of Toxicological, Biological and Radiation Safety, Scientific Town-2, Kazan city, 420075, Russia

Nikolay M Vasilevskiy
Biological Safety Lab, Federal Center of Toxicological, Biological and Radiation Safety, Scientific Town-2, Kazan city, 420075, Russia

Irina A Arkharova
Biological Safety Lab, Federal Center of Toxicological, Biological and Radiation Safety, Scientific Town-2, Kazan city, 420075, Russia
Online First: May 02, 2017 | Cite this Article
Plotnikova et al., Е., Nikitin, A., Nizamov, R., Makaev, H., Papunidi, K., Vasilevskiy, N., Arkharova, I. 2017. Effect of ionizing radiation on cellular metabolism and virus-producing ability of cell cultures. Bali Medical Journal 6(2): 294-297. DOI:10.15562/bmj.v6i2.526


The studies were conducted with the aim to investigate the possibilities of using radiation biotechnology methods for decontamination of cell culture media, stimulation of cell growth in cultures, and virus reproduction on the latter. The simulation of artificial contamination of culture media was performed by supplementing the media with bacterial agents at a dose of 1.5 × 106 CFU/mL and infectious povine rhinotracheitis virus at a dose of 0.2 cm3/100 cm3 (g) of a medium, with the virus titer of 6.0 lg TCD 50/cm3. Both native and contaminated with the above-specified microorganisms culture media were exposed to γ radiation in the “Issledovatel” γ irradiation facility in the dose range from 0.1 to 1 × 104 Gy. It was established that reliable decontamination of dry culture media was achieved by their exposure to γ radiation at doses of 0.5−2 × 10Gy, whereas decontamination of liquid culture media was efficient at doses of 1.0−2 × 104 Gy. Following artificial contamination of cell culture media, with microorganisms of bacterial and viral nature, reliable radiosterilization was accomplished by γ irradiation at a dose of 3 × 104 Gy. The outcomes of cytological studies showed that a single and twice repeated exposures of Madin–Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cell cultures to a wide dose range (0.5–10.0 Gy) of γ rays exerted divergent influence on cells: low doses (0.5–1 Gy) stimulated cell growth, development, and proliferation, whereas high doses inhibited those processes increasing cell death. Exposure of cells to a low dose (0.05 Gy) and, repeatedly, to a high dose (5.95 Gy) of γ radiation stimulated cell growth and proliferative activity in the MDBK cell line. It was found that pre-irradiation of cells with a low dose (0.05 Gy) and a consequent re-exposure to a high dose (5.95 Gy) inhibited chromosomal aberrations in the form of bridges, fragments, and breaks. Therefore, based on the study results, the optimal modes of decontamination of cell culture media by γ irradiation were determined. By the method of fractionated irradiation, a new MDBK-0.2 cell subline was obtained with increased proliferative and virus reproduction activity.

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