ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Molecular detection of avian influenza virus from birds sold in a multi-species animal market at Jakarta-Indonesia

Dordia Anindita Rotinsulu , Surachmi Setiyaningsih, Abdulgani Amri Siregar

Dordia Anindita Rotinsulu
Divison of Medical Microbiology, Department of Animal Infectious Diseases and Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia. Email: dordia.anindita@gmail.com

Surachmi Setiyaningsih
Divison of Medical Microbiology, Department of Animal Infectious Diseases and Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia

Abdulgani Amri Siregar
Divison of Medical Microbiology, Department of Animal Infectious Diseases and Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia
Online First: August 04, 2017 | Cite this Article
Rotinsulu, D., Setiyaningsih, S., Siregar, A. 2017. Molecular detection of avian influenza virus from birds sold in a multi-species animal market at Jakarta-Indonesia. Bali Medical Journal 6(3): S75-S79. DOI:10.15562/bmj.v3i3.729


Avian Influenza (AI) is a zoonotic disease caused by influenza virus A of the family Orthomyxoviridae. The Avian Influenza virus infects various birds and mammals, including humans. Multi species live animal markets, as a meeting places for human, birds, mammals, and reptiles, can potentially transmit the AI virus from animals to humans.  The purpose of this study was to detect the presence of Avian Influenza virus by the detection of Matrix and H5 genes from various bird species sold in a multi species live animal market in Jakarta using real-time Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (rRT-PCR). 862 field samples from 28 families and 96 bird species were collected using a cross-sectional sampling technique. These field samples consisted of 649 fecal samples, 114 cloacal swab samples, and 99 tracheal swab samples. The samples were pooled based on the type of sample and kiosk where the samples were collected. The presence of AI virus was screened using rRT-PCR targeting the matrix gene, followed by further test targeting the H5 gene for AI virus subtyping. Positive AI samples were only detected in 7 out of 649 fecal samples (1.08%); however, all of them were not H5 AI virus. Positive AI samples were detected in four bird species, which were three magpie-robins (Copsychussaularis, family Turdidae), two white-eyes (Zosteropspalpebrosus, family Zostropidae), a Yellow-vented bulbul (Pycnonotusgoiavier, family Pycnotidae), and a robin (Leiothrixlutea, family Sylviidae).

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