ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Fat intake in Javanese breast cancer patients: any difference?

Christian Christian, Niken Puruhita , Arientasari Himawan, Siti Fatimah Muis, Minidian Fasitasari, Eko Adhi Pangarsa, Sonar Soni Panigoro, Noorwati Sutandyo

Christian Christian
Resident of Clinical Nutrition Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Diponegoro-Dr. Kariadi Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia

Niken Puruhita
Clinical Nutrition Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Diponegoro-Dr. Kariadi Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia ; Clinical Nutrition Department, SMC Telogorejo Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia. Email: nsetiyadi3004@gmail.com

Arientasari Himawan
Clinical Nutrition Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Diponegoro-Dr. Kariadi Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia ; Clinical Nutrition Department, SMC Telogorejo Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia

Siti Fatimah Muis
Clinical Nutrition Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Diponegoro-Dr. Kariadi Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia

Minidian Fasitasari
Clinical Nutrition Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Diponegoro-Dr. Kariadi Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia ; Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Islam Sultan Agung-Sultan Agung Islamic Hospital Semarang, Indonesia

Eko Adhi Pangarsa
Hematology-Oncology Division, Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Diponegoro-Dr. Kariadi Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia

Sonar Soni Panigoro
Oncology Surgery Division, Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia-Ciptomangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia

Noorwati Sutandyo
Hematology-Oncology Division, Internal Medicine Department, Dharmais National Cancer Centre Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia
Online First: April 30, 2021 | Cite this Article
Christian, C., Puruhita, N., Himawan, A., Muis, S., Fasitasari, M., Pangarsa, E., Panigoro, S., Sutandyo, N. 2021. Fat intake in Javanese breast cancer patients: any difference?. Bali Medical Journal 10(1): 320-324. DOI:10.15562/bmj.v10i1.2173


Background: Breast cancer is the second most prevalent women’s malignancy in Central Java. The risk of breast cancer incidence drops by 2.5 times for breast cancer if fat consumption is reduced by 50%, although not all types of fat intake increase the risk of breast cancer incidence. Fat consumption in Indonesia increased by 11% in the last 7 years. The study aims to analyze the differences in fat intake between breast cancer subjects and healthy subjects.

Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study. We invited 45 outpatients diagnosed with breast cancer in Kariadi Hospital from January to August 2019 as well as 45 healthy subjects who are relatives or friends of the patients who met the inclusion criteria to participate in this study. Various types of fat intake were measured with quantitative food frequency questionnaires. The statistical analysis employed a chi-square test and Mann-Whitney test for non-parametric tests and an independent t-test for parametric data.

Results: There was a significant difference in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake between breast cancer patients and healthy subjects (p=0.022). This study found no significant differences in total fat intake (p=0.677), saturated fatty acid (SFA) (p=0.368), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) (p=0.593), omega 3 (p=0.095), omega 6 (p=0.092), and TFA (p=0.669) between breast cancer patients and healthy subjects.

Conclusion: There is a significant difference in PUFA intake, but not in the other types of fat between breast cancer patients and healthy subjects. For further study, more precise and objective fat intake measurements may be achieved in studies with animal models.

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