Skip to main content Skip to main navigation menu Skip to site footer

Calming effect of Javanese Handwriting Calligraphy, preliminary study based on neuroaesthetics

Abstract

Introduction: Javanese Handwriting Calligraphy (JHC) is taught at the elementary & junior high school level on Java island in Indonesia. Calligraphy is part of Javanese culture and language. The number of Javanese speakers worldwide is 85 million (speakers of the 11th language worldwide). The study was conducted using elements of art and visuospatial aspects in Javanese calligraphy, not far from Chinese calligraphy, which has been proven to affect neuropsychiatric therapy. This research is a preliminary study aimed at proving JHC calming effect.

Method: Thirty elementary school students who are already proficient in writing JHC and willing to participate in the study voluntarily in placed in a quiet room, then the pulse rate was measured before and after writing calligraphy Latin letters. Next, rest for 15 minutes and measure the pulse before and after writing JHC.

Results: There is no difference in heart rate before the intervention in writing Latin and Javanese letters (p = 0.382). There is a difference in heart rate after the intervention of Latin and Javanese letters (p = 0.006). There is no difference in the value before and after the Latin letter intervention (p = 0.651). There is a difference between before and after the intervention of writing Javanese letters (p = 0.018).

Conclusion: JHC can be considered as a way of calming down. More research on different age groups and more robust designs is needed (cross-over).

References

  1. Yurisaldi Saleh A. POTENTIAL OF JAVANESE HANDWRITING CALLIGRAPHY (HANACARAKA) FOR COGNITIVE THERAPY. Int J Sci Res. 2022;1–9. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.36106/ijsr/7321882
  2. Yurisaldi Saleh A. NEUROAESTHETIC, A BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS. Int J Sci Res. 2022;10–5. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.36106/ijsr/7121954
  3. Kao Sr H, Zhu L, Chao AA, Chen HY, Liu IC, Zhang M. Calligraphy and meditation for stress reduction: an experimental comparison. Psychol Res Behav Manag. 2014;7:47–52. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24611024
  4. Kao HS, Lam SP, Kao TT. Chinese calligraphy handwriting (CCH): a case of rehabilitative awakening of a coma patient after stroke. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2018;14:407–17. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29440902
  5. Xu M, Kao HSR, Zhang M, Lam SPW, Wang W. Cognitive-neural effects of brush writing of chinese characters: cortical excitation of theta rhythm. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013/02/26. 2013;2013:975190. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23533532
  6. Kwok TCY, Bai X, Kao HSR, Li JCY, Ho FKY. Cognitive effects of calligraphy therapy for older people: a randomized controlled trial in Hong Kong. Clin Interv Aging. 2011/10/19. 2011;6:269–73. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22087066
  7. Chan SCC, Chan CCH, Derbie AY, Hui I, Tan DGH, Pang MYC, et al. Chinese Calligraphy Writing for Augmenting Attentional Control and Working Memory of Older Adults at Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial. J Alzheimer's Dis. 2017;58(3):735–46. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/jad-170024
  8. Chu K-Y, Huang C-Y, Ouyang W-C. Does Chinese calligraphy therapy reduce neuropsychiatric symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Psychiatry. 2018;18(1):62. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29514660
  9. Kao HSR, Xu M, Kao TT. Calligraphy, Psychology and the Confucian Literati Personality. Psychol Dev Soc J. 2021;33(1):54–72. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0971333621990449
  10. Wang C-M, Chen Y-C. Design of an Interactive Mind Calligraphy System by Affective Computing and Visualization Techniques for Real-Time Reflections of the Writer's Emotions. Sensors (Basel). 2020;20(20):5741. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33050320

How to Cite

Arman Yurisaldi Saleh, Miky Miky Endro Santoso, Murwantara, W. ., Yulianti, R. ., & Prabowo, I. . (2022). Calming effect of Javanese Handwriting Calligraphy, preliminary study based on neuroaesthetics. Bali Medical Journal, 11(3), 1976–1981. https://doi.org/10.15562/bmj.v11i3.3598

HTML
3

Total
3

Share

Search Panel

Arman Yurisaldi Saleh
Google Scholar
Pubmed
BMJ Journal


Miky Miky Endro Santoso
Google Scholar
Pubmed
BMJ Journal


Wawan Murwantara
Google Scholar
Pubmed
BMJ Journal


Retno Yulianti
Google Scholar
Pubmed
BMJ Journal


Imam Prabowo
Google Scholar
Pubmed
BMJ Journal