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Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α), Nuclear Factor of kappa B (NF-kB) p65 and Calcineurin Expression play a role in the regulation of muscle regeneration process through aerobic exercise in HIV patients

  • Sri Mardjiati Mei Wulan ,
  • Hening Laswati ,
  • Windhu Purnomo ,
  • Alex Pangkahila ,
  • Nasronudin Nasronudin ,
  • Usman Hadi ,

Abstract

Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is a chronic disease with inflammatory conditions and experience progressive muscle wasting with increasing of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Physical exercise is a non-pharmacological therapy which stimulate the muscle regeneration. Moderate intensity of aerobic exercise is safe for human immunodeficiency virus  patients. Whether tumor necrosis factor alpha plays a role in the process of muscle regeneration in human immunodeficiency virus  infection who have had tumor necrosis factor alpha level higher

Objective: To explain the role of tumor necrosis factor alpha, NF-kappaB, and Calcineurin expression in the regulation of muscle regeneration process.

Methods: Research subjects are population with clinical stage II human immunodeficiency virus infection. Subjects were grouped in to two: I (n = 9) as subjects who got aerobic exercise for 8 weeks and C (n = 9) as subjects who were observe for 8 weeks. Muscle samples were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle biopsies that were performed 24 hours after the last physical exercise. And the immunohistochemical examination was done with anti- tumor necrosis factor alpha monoclonal antibody, anti- NF-kappaB. and anti-calcineurin.

Results: The relationship of muscle contraction to Tumor necrosis factor alpha and calcineurin expression, and to the other myogenic factors was significant, but not to NF-kappaB p65 expression. NF-kappaB p65 has another path.Conclusion: Muscle regeneration process need TNF-alpha, and NF-kB p65 expression as regulators with TNF-alpha_NF-kB p65_myogenic factors as path of exercise and calcineurin expression as regulator with calcineurin_myogenic factors as path of exercise.

References

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How to Cite

Mei Wulan, S. M., Laswati, H., Purnomo, W., Pangkahila, A., Nasronudin, N., & Hadi, U. (2017). Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α), Nuclear Factor of kappa B (NF-kB) p65 and Calcineurin Expression play a role in the regulation of muscle regeneration process through aerobic exercise in HIV patients. Bali Medical Journal, 6(2), 421–426. https://doi.org/10.15562/bmj.v6i2.607

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